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PETA SA Our Strategic objectives

The PETA-SAs sole objective is to improve teaching, training and learning, through supporting individual practitioners in memberships through a professional body to the best of their ability across the full diversity of the sector. We do this by delivering our three strategic priorities:

  • by giving benefits and especially professional development to practitioners;
  • by according status in recognition of expertise;
  • and by giving a voice so that learning and teaching professional can inform policy.

Despite recent progress, teachers and trainers in further education and skills remain under recognised in the public domain and policy making circles, and in comparison with both other professional.

Membership of the PETA-SA is part of individuals investing time and commitment to their own professionalism. The association, as is typical of professional bodies, also seeks to draw in new resources and financial investment that otherwise would not be available to professionals or the sector. In this way, we support the drive for excellence in teaching and training beyond what the state and employers can support.

Leaders and managers across the further education and skills sector benefit from encouraging and supporting teaching and training practitioners on their professional journey through membership. Utilising professional body membership and the services for individuals also benefits colleges and providers, as we have described in this document, dual professionals are able to provide a holistic and powerful learning experience through course content that is contextualised for up-to-date industry practices, developments and leading edge teaching, learning and assessment methods. PETA-SA seeks to ensure that quality of teaching and learning is at its highest possible and promotes a constructive dialogue between industry and providers and teaching and learning professionals.

What is the QCTO

What is the QCTO

The QCTO will manage and  coordinate the qualifications in the occupational qualifications  framework  in terms  of their development, provision,  assessment and  impact.  Its scope will be the development and  quality assurance of fit-for-purpose  occupational qualifications and  unit standards as required by the labour  market  for work and  employment purposes.

The QCTO will develop fit-for-purpose  occupational qualifications that will be certificated as National  Occupational Awards  or National  Skills Certificates. The awards will name the relevant occupation that the learner is now competent to practice. The focus  of occupational qualifications will be the development of occupational competence which, in turn, contributes to increased employment rates and  productivity.

The envisaged structure and  functions  of the QCTO reflect a new approach to quality assurance, in which quality assurance permeates all activities  and  is not seen as a separate function. This model  was  developed in response to appeals to bring qualifications development and  quality assurance ‘under one  roof’.

The quality assurance of the learning  process for the QCTO’s qualifications can be visualised as a structure in which the roof is supported by two pillars: design and  development on the one  side,  and  the assessment of occupational competence on the other.  The system is quality managed from the overarching ‘roof’, representing monitoring  and  evaluation through  data  analysis and research. This entire  structure illustrates the quality-assurance model.

Professional education and training practitioners definition

Professional education and training practitioners definition.

“The highest standards for teaching, training and learning, supported by the professional body.”

Professional education and training practitioners by definition:

  • are dual professionals, having deep knowledge, conceptual understanding and expertise in teaching and learning processes and contexts for diverse learners, matched with expert subject knowledge and skills,
  • have a personal commitment to reflect on and share expertise with professional colleagues, to innovate and learn from the best national and international practices, and through professional body membership,
  • enjoy professional recognition and status, and hold at least a NQF level 5 qualifications in learning and teaching, or be committed to work towards this in the near future,
  • have the ability and space to make judgements and decisions based on knowledge and experience and so practising with autonomy, trust and accountability
  • expect a professionalised environment in which to operate, where leaders and managers are responsible for ensuring a collaborative culture which secures excellence, resting on trust and confidence
  • deserve career pathways which offer suitable rewards to individual professionals as they demonstrate excellence.

QCTO – Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

The Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) is a Quality Council established in 2010 in terms of the Skills Development Act. Its role is to oversee the design, implementation, assessment and certification of occupational qualifications on the Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework (OQSF).

The QCTO is one of three Quality Councils (QCs) responsible for a part of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). Collectively, the Quality Councils and the South African Qualifications Authority (whose role is to advance the objectives of the NQF and oversee its development and implementation), all work for the good of both learners and employers. Another important role for the QCTO is to offer guidance to service providers who must be accredited by the QCTO to offer occupational qualifications.

Following the format of the organizing framework for Occupations (QFO), occupational qualifications are categorised into the eight major employment groups.

  • Managers;
  • Professionals;
  • Technicians and Associate Professionals;
  • Clerical Support Workers;
  • Service and Sales Workers;
  • Skilled agriculture, forestry, fisheries, craft and related trades
  • Plant and Machine Operators and Assemblers; and
  • Elementary Occupations.

Our vision is to qualify a skilled and capable workforce; our mission is to effectively and efficiently manage the occupational qualifications sub-framework in order to set standards, develop and quality assure national occupational qualifications for all who want a trade or occupation and, where appropriate, professions.

Personal commitment to their own professionalism

Personal commitment to their own professionalism

Individual teachers and trainers have a responsibility for their own professionalism. They shape and influence their own development often in collaboration with peers and with the support of their employers and their professional body. Leaders and managers have the responsibility for the culture, ethos and systems that support a professional workforce to be at its best. The employer does not own the professionalism of individual practitioners, as this would damage and detract from the vital personal commitment of being an up-to-date and reflective professional. PETA-SA professional body membership supports teachers and trainers to look curiously and widely to best practice nationally and internationally, as well as enabling reciprocity and sharing of good practice between members. Commitment to collaboration is integral to the professional identity and roles of all teaching and learning practitioners and to the work of the professional body in fostering this, as well as leaders and managers.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) keeps individuals on the top of our game and encourages everyone to maintain and development as teachers and trainers, and prevents stagnation by keeping up to date through CPD rewarding programmes.

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