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Criteria for the approval of an Assessment Quality Partner

The QCTO will appoint an entity as an assessment quality partner only if it is satisfied that the entity has: i.      The necessary expertise, experience and standing in relation to the occupational qualifications or foundational learning for which the assessment quality partner is appointed; and ii.      the resources necessary to perform its functions In terms of clause of the QCTO Delegation Policy, 22 June 2011 the criteria have been defined in detail as follows: i.     be  recommended  to  the  QCTO  by  the  relevant      DQP  during  the occupational                           development  process at a point  when they submit  an occupational profile. Possible evidence: letter of recommendation from [...]

Know Your Audience

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The starting point for all communication is becoming aware of the intended audience and approaching them on an appropriate level. So many times, people get themselves into difficult situations because they did not consider the audience’s reaction to the message. Anyone could make a list of controversies that started as the result of an insensitive remark or one that was not well thought out. In addition to considering what the message says, as a writer (and speaker) you need to consider how the ideas are expressed.

To ensure successful written communication, first think about the people who will read it. By putting yourself in their shoes, you will gain insight into what they want to know and how they want to be addressed. The Temple of Apollo at Delphi in Greece has an inscription that cautions each person to “know yourself.” Improving communications encourages people to know thy audience.

Salespeople are no strangers to the concept of “put yourself in the buyer’s position.” It means that the seller (in this case, you as writer) will consider what features and benefits to present to the person on the receiving end. Word choice and message length (think: brevity) will show your recipient how much thought and care you put into crafting your message.

Audiences are composed of people, all of whom have different perceptions. These questions will yield a variety of answers, simply because perceptions differ:

      -What is a lot of money?

 

      -What is tall?

 

    -What is hot?

To avoid having messages misperceived, misconstrued or misunderstood, choose language that will be understood by most (preferably all) of your recipients. Think of the individuals who comprise your audience before you communicate with them. Ask yourself:

      -Who is the audience?

 

      -Why am I writing/presenting? What do I want my audience to know or do?

 

      -What do they already know? What is their level of understanding?

 

      -What is their likely attitude about the topic?

 

      -What does my audience want to achieve?

 

      -What medium will support the message the best — e-mail, letter, memo, report, proposal, etc.?

 

    -What format or layout will appeal to the audience and support the message?

Then, as the final step before beginning to write, organize your ideas. It’s a true sign of respect for your audience. Show that you are concerned for their time and attention. Plan to present the information that will make the most sense to them. Your organizational pattern may take any form (chronological, inside to outside, top to bottom, etc.). However you deliver the information, just make sure that someone new to your subject area will “get it” without having to strain the brain to do so. With all this in place, you’re ready to put fingers to keyboard, or (how dated to say…) pen to paper. Approach the task with a positive attitude, a clear purpose and straightforward organization, and you’ll be on the path to achieving your goal.