conduct

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 2

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 2

In this short video we look at Conducting Assessment for dummies part 2.

Links used in this video clip.

SAQA Website: www.saqa.org.za

TRAINYOUCAN Video Blog: www.youcantrain.co.za

YouTube Video

See our video online here: http://youtu.be/xunlJOg30vc

ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Assessment Process

GENERAL RULES

  1. Use a black pen.
  2. No single words or terms.
  3. Time cost money.
  4. No empty spaces.
  5. Evidence, evidence and evidence.

PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT

What? = Did you review the unit standard? Equipment, workplace, documents required, do you have the scope to assess this, are you registered with that SETA?

Where? = Place, venue, arranged with who?

When? = When will this happen – might be a series of events over more than one day, who did you confirm this with?

How? = Why type of instructions will you use – any role-players involved?

PREPARE FOR ASSESSMENT

This can be a meeting with the learner (at least 24 hours before the time) to make arrangements for the assessment.

Why is this important? Try and answer the questions below and see for yourself.

  • What happens if the learner comes to the assessment and he is not prepared. (Cost factor and who is responsible | disciplinary | cost)
  • What must the learner bring. What happens if he tells you he did not know that he must do something, or bring a form with?
  • Say for example the learner have special needs and you did not address it. He appeals and you get called into the SETA’s offices to answer.
  • Going for a test is stressful, so put the learner at ease and explain the process.
  • Do you own pre-assessment to see if the learner is ready or now. Ask him any question about the learning, or check how far is he with his projects or activities.
  • You must do a role-play, so who is going to help you with this?

CONDUCT ASSESSMENT

  • Examples of Instruments:
  • Concept Maps – A diagramming technique for assessing how well students see the “big picture”.
  • Concept Tests – Conceptual multiple-choice questions that are useful in large classes.
  • Knowledge Survey – Students answer whether they could answer a survey of course content questions.
  • Exams – Find tips on how to make exams better assessment instruments.
  • Oral Presentations – Tips for evaluating student presentations.
  • Poster Presentations – Tips for evaluating poster presentations.
  • Peer Review – Having students assess themselves and each other.
  • Portfolios – A collection of evidence to demonstrate mastery of a given set of concepts.
  • Rubrics – A set of evaluation criteria based on learning goals and student performance.
  • Written Reports – Tips for assessing written reports.

Other Assessment Types Includes concept sketches, case studies, seminar-style courses, mathematical thinking and performance assessments.

 Forms of Evidence

Evidence can come from a variety of sources. The assessor needs to ensure that he/she has enough evidence to make an accurate judgement about a learner’s competence.

  •  Evidence of knowledge:        Assess the ability to recall information (written or oral examination).
  •  Evidence of applied knowledge:      Assess the ability to apply knowledge and demonstrate performance in the workplace.
  •  Evidence of understanding:             Assess the ability to understand the impact of applied knowledge in the context of the workplace.
  •  Evidence of problem solving:           Assess the ability to analyse a problem and provide effective solutions.

 Types of evidence

  •  Direct evidence : Evidence produced by the learner and direct observation of performance, while executing the task.
  •  Indirect evidence : Evidence produced about the learner, either from another source or by the learner him/herself.
  •  Supplementary evidence : Refers to past achievements of what the learner is capable of doing.

Sponsored by TRAINYOUCAN

TRAINYOUCAN  is an accredited training provider through the South African Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) and provide both accredited and customised learning programmes to organisations looking to maximise their investment in developing their staff.

 

 

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 3

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 3

In this short video we look at Conducting Assessment for dummies part 1.

Links used in this video clip.

SAQA Website: www.saqa.org.za

TRAINYOUCAN Video Blog: www.youcantrain.co.za

YouTube Video
Watch this video on YouTube.

See our video online here: http://youtu.be/9Y9v_ZddKjI

ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Assessment Process

GENERAL RULES

  1. Use a black pen.
  2. No single words or terms.
  3. Time cost money.
  4. No empty spaces.
  5. Evidence, evidence and evidence.

PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT

What? = Did you review the unit standard? Equipment, workplace, documents required, do you have the scope to assess this, are you registered with that SETA?

Where? = Place, venue, arranged with who?

When? = When will this happen – might be a series of events over more than one day, who did you confirm this with?

How? = Why type of instructions will you use – any role-players involved?

PREPARE FOR ASSESSMENT

This can be a meeting with the learner (at least 24 hours before the time) to make arrangements for the assessment.

Why is this important? Try and answer the questions below and see for yourself.

  • What happens if the learner comes to the assessment and he is not prepared. (Cost factor and who is responsible | disciplinary | cost)
  • What must the learner bring. What happens if he tells you he did not know that he must do something, or bring a form with?
  • Say for example the learner have special needs and you did not address it. He appeals and you get called into the SETA’s offices to answer.
  • Going for a test is stressful, so put the learner at ease and explain the process.
  • Do you own pre-assessment to see if the learner is ready or now. Ask him any question about the learning, or check how far is he with his projects or activities.
  • You must do a role-play, so who is going to help you with this?

CONDUCT ASSESSMENT

  • Examples of Instruments:
  • Concept Maps – A diagramming technique for assessing how well students see the “big picture”.
  • Concept Tests – Conceptual multiple-choice questions that are useful in large classes.
  • Knowledge Survey – Students answer whether they could answer a survey of course content questions.
  • Exams – Find tips on how to make exams better assessment instruments.
  • Oral Presentations – Tips for evaluating student presentations.
  • Poster Presentations – Tips for evaluating poster presentations.
  • Peer Review – Having students assess themselves and each other.
  • Portfolios – A collection of evidence to demonstrate mastery of a given set of concepts.
  • Rubrics – A set of evaluation criteria based on learning goals and student performance.
  • Written Reports – Tips for assessing written reports.

Other Assessment Types Includes concept sketches, case studies, seminar-style courses, mathematical thinking and performance assessments.

 Forms of Evidence

Evidence can come from a variety of sources. The assessor needs to ensure that he/she has enough evidence to make an accurate judgement about a learner’s competence.

  •  Evidence of knowledge:        Assess the ability to recall information (written or oral examination).
  •  Evidence of applied knowledge:      Assess the ability to apply knowledge and demonstrate performance in the workplace.
  •  Evidence of understanding:             Assess the ability to understand the impact of applied knowledge in the context of the workplace.
  •  Evidence of problem solving:           Assess the ability to analyse a problem and provide effective solutions.

 Types of evidence

  •  Direct evidence : Evidence produced by the learner and direct observation of performance, while executing the task.
  •  Indirect evidence : Evidence produced about the learner, either from another source or by the learner him/herself.
  •  Supplementary evidence : Refers to past achievements of what the learner is capable of doing.

ASSESSMENT JUDGEMENTS

  1. You can only find someone “COMPETENT” over collective questions, complete instrument or a full unit standard. This means that you cannot mark the person as competent for each questions or instructions.
  2. We rate individual knowledge, questions or instructions with:
      • a rating scale
      •  Meet Requirements /Do not meet Requirements
      •  Yes/or No
  3. You must collect a) evidence to provide proof that the assessment took place + b) collect evidence that the learner can perform the task + c) collect evidence that he/she practically can perform the skill / or performed it in the workplace.
  4. Remember the rules of evidence:
  • valid
  • authentic
  • consistent
  • sufficient
  • current

 FEEDBACK

This is where the Appeals Process always come in handy. Learners claim that you never provided feedback or told them what they did wrong. GET PROOF THAT YOU PROVIDED FEEDBACK!

  • STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF FEEDBACK
  •  TYPE AND MANNER OF FEEDBACK IS PROVIDED
    • Providing Constructive Feedback
    • Constructive feedback – An essential element of assessment
  •  FEEDBACK OBTAINED FROM CANDIDATE
  •  DISPUTES AND APPEALS
  •  RECORDING OF FEEDBACK

REVIEW PROCESSES

  • REVIEW STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES
  • FEEDBACK FROM RELEVANT PARTIES
  • WEAKNESSES IDENTIFIED

Ever found problems with the Assessment Process or the Guide and no-one seems to take care of fix it? Well, this is where you provide feedback and review the entire assessment process to ensure this was properly.

Now what do you think is going to happen when the Moderator Moderates your Assessments 4 weeks later and find that you did not sign documents or included all the evidence in your Assessment Guide. He change the Assessment Decision from “Competent” to “Not-Yet-Competent”. The learner phones you and ask what’s going on?

Sponsored by TRAINYOUCAN

TRAINYOUCAN  is an accredited training provider through the South African Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) and provide both accredited and customised learning programmes to organisations looking to maximise their investment in developing their staff.

 

 

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 3

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 3

In this short video we look at Conducting Assessment for dummies part 3.

Links used in this video clip.

SAQA Website: www.saqa.org.za

TRAINYOUCAN Video Blog: www.youcantrain.co.za

httpv://youtu.be/9Y9v_ZddKjI

See our video online here: http://youtu.be/9Y9v_ZddKjI

ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Assessment Process

GENERAL RULES

  1. Use a black pen.
  2. No single words or terms.
  3. Time cost money.
  4. No empty spaces.
  5. Evidence, evidence and evidence.

PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT

What? = Did you review the unit standard? Equipment, workplace, documents required, do you have the scope to assess this, are you registered with that SETA?

Where? = Place, venue, arranged with who?

When? = When will this happen – might be a series of events over more than one day, who did you confirm this with?

How? = Why type of instructions will you use – any role-players involved?

PREPARE FOR ASSESSMENT

This can be a meeting with the learner (at least 24 hours before the time) to make arrangements for the assessment.

Why is this important? Try and answer the questions below and see for yourself.

  • What happens if the learner comes to the assessment and he is not prepared. (Cost factor and who is responsible | disciplinary | cost)
  • What must the learner bring. What happens if he tells you he did not know that he must do something, or bring a form with?
  • Say for example the learner have special needs and you did not address it. He appeals and you get called into the SETA’s offices to answer.
  • Going for a test is stressful, so put the learner at ease and explain the process.
  • Do you own pre-assessment to see if the learner is ready or now. Ask him any question about the learning, or check how far is he with his projects or activities.
  • You must do a role-play, so who is going to help you with this?

CONDUCT ASSESSMENT

  • Examples of Instruments:
  • Concept Maps – A diagramming technique for assessing how well students see the “big picture”.
  • Concept Tests – Conceptual multiple-choice questions that are useful in large classes.
  • Knowledge Survey – Students answer whether they could answer a survey of course content questions.
  • Exams – Find tips on how to make exams better assessment instruments.
  • Oral Presentations – Tips for evaluating student presentations.
  • Poster Presentations – Tips for evaluating poster presentations.
  • Peer Review – Having students assess themselves and each other.
  • Portfolios – A collection of evidence to demonstrate mastery of a given set of concepts.
  • Rubrics – A set of evaluation criteria based on learning goals and student performance.
  • Written Reports – Tips for assessing written reports.

Other Assessment Types Includes concept sketches, case studies, seminar-style courses, mathematical thinking and performance assessments.

 Forms of Evidence

Evidence can come from a variety of sources. The assessor needs to ensure that he/she has enough evidence to make an accurate judgement about a learner’s competence.

  •  Evidence of knowledge:        Assess the ability to recall information (written or oral examination).
  •  Evidence of applied knowledge:      Assess the ability to apply knowledge and demonstrate performance in the workplace.
  •  Evidence of understanding:             Assess the ability to understand the impact of applied knowledge in the context of the workplace.
  •  Evidence of problem solving:           Assess the ability to analyse a problem and provide effective solutions.

 Types of evidence

  •  Direct evidence : Evidence produced by the learner and direct observation of performance, while executing the task.
  •  Indirect evidence : Evidence produced about the learner, either from another source or by the learner him/herself.
  •  Supplementary evidence : Refers to past achievements of what the learner is capable of doing.

ASSESSMENT JUDGEMENTS

  1. You can only find someone “COMPETENT” over collective questions, complete instrument or a full unit standard. This means that you cannot mark the person as competent for each questions or instructions.
  2. We rate individual knowledge, questions or instructions with:
      • a rating scale
      •  Meet Requirements /Do not meet Requirements
      •  Yes/or No
  3. You must collect a) evidence to provide proof that the assessment took place + b) collect evidence that the learner can perform the task + c) collect evidence that he/she practically can perform the skill / or performed it in the workplace.
  4. Remember the rules of evidence:
  • valid
  • authentic
  • consistent
  • sufficient
  • current

 FEEDBACK

This is where the Appeals Process always come in handy. Learners claim that you never provided feedback or told them what they did wrong. GET PROOF THAT YOU PROVIDED FEEDBACK!

  • STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF FEEDBACK
  •  TYPE AND MANNER OF FEEDBACK IS PROVIDED
    • Providing Constructive Feedback
    • Constructive feedback – An essential element of assessment
  •  FEEDBACK OBTAINED FROM CANDIDATE
  •  DISPUTES AND APPEALS
  •  RECORDING OF FEEDBACK

REVIEW PROCESSES

  • REVIEW STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES
  • FEEDBACK FROM RELEVANT PARTIES
  • WEAKNESSES IDENTIFIED

Ever found problems with the Assessment Process or the Guide and no-one seems to take care of fix it? Well, this is where you provide feedback and review the entire assessment process to ensure this was properly.

Now what do you think is going to happen when the Moderator Moderates your Assessments 4 weeks later and find that you did not sign documents or included all the evidence in your Assessment Guide. He change the Assessment Decision from “Competent” to “Not-Yet-Competent”. The learner phones you and ask what’s going on?

Sponsored by TRAINYOUCAN

TRAINYOUCAN  is an accredited training provider through the South African Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) and provide both accredited and customised learning programmes to organisations looking to maximise their investment in developing their staff.

 

 

VIDEO: Conduct Assessment for dummies part 2

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 2

In this short video we look at Conducting Assessment for dummies part 2.

Links used in this video clip.

SAQA Website: www.saqa.org.za

TRAINYOUCAN Video Blog: www.youcantrain.co.za

httpv://youtu.be/xunlJOg30vc

See our video online here: http://youtu.be/xunlJOg30vc

ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Assessment Process

GENERAL RULES

  1. Use a black pen.
  2. No single words or terms.
  3. Time cost money.
  4. No empty spaces.
  5. Evidence, evidence and evidence.

PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT

What? = Did you review the unit standard? Equipment, workplace, documents required, do you have the scope to assess this, are you registered with that SETA?

Where? = Place, venue, arranged with who?

When? = When will this happen – might be a series of events over more than one day, who did you confirm this with?

How? = Why type of instructions will you use – any role-players involved?

PREPARE FOR ASSESSMENT

This can be a meeting with the learner (at least 24 hours before the time) to make arrangements for the assessment.

Why is this important? Try and answer the questions below and see for yourself.

  • What happens if the learner comes to the assessment and he is not prepared. (Cost factor and who is responsible | disciplinary | cost)
  • What must the learner bring. What happens if he tells you he did not know that he must do something, or bring a form with?
  • Say for example the learner have special needs and you did not address it. He appeals and you get called into the SETA’s offices to answer.
  • Going for a test is stressful, so put the learner at ease and explain the process.
  • Do you own pre-assessment to see if the learner is ready or now. Ask him any question about the learning, or check how far is he with his projects or activities.
  • You must do a role-play, so who is going to help you with this?

CONDUCT ASSESSMENT

  • Examples of Instruments:
  • Concept Maps – A diagramming technique for assessing how well students see the “big picture”.
  • Concept Tests – Conceptual multiple-choice questions that are useful in large classes.
  • Knowledge Survey – Students answer whether they could answer a survey of course content questions.
  • Exams – Find tips on how to make exams better assessment instruments.
  • Oral Presentations – Tips for evaluating student presentations.
  • Poster Presentations – Tips for evaluating poster presentations.
  • Peer Review – Having students assess themselves and each other.
  • Portfolios – A collection of evidence to demonstrate mastery of a given set of concepts.
  • Rubrics – A set of evaluation criteria based on learning goals and student performance.
  • Written Reports – Tips for assessing written reports.

Other Assessment Types Includes concept sketches, case studies, seminar-style courses, mathematical thinking and performance assessments.

 Forms of Evidence

Evidence can come from a variety of sources. The assessor needs to ensure that he/she has enough evidence to make an accurate judgement about a learner’s competence.

  •  Evidence of knowledge:        Assess the ability to recall information (written or oral examination).
  •  Evidence of applied knowledge:      Assess the ability to apply knowledge and demonstrate performance in the workplace.
  •  Evidence of understanding:             Assess the ability to understand the impact of applied knowledge in the context of the workplace.
  •  Evidence of problem solving:           Assess the ability to analyse a problem and provide effective solutions.

 Types of evidence

  •  Direct evidence : Evidence produced by the learner and direct observation of performance, while executing the task.
  •  Indirect evidence : Evidence produced about the learner, either from another source or by the learner him/herself.
  •  Supplementary evidence : Refers to past achievements of what the learner is capable of doing.

Sponsored by TRAINYOUCAN

TRAINYOUCAN  is an accredited training provider through the South African Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) and provide both accredited and customised learning programmes to organisations looking to maximise their investment in developing their staff.

 

 

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 1

Conduct Assessment for dummies part 1

In this short video we look at Conducting Assessment for dummies part 1.

Links used in this video clip.

SAQA Website: www.saqa.org.za

TRAINYOUCAN Video Blog: www.youcantrain.co.za

httpv://youtu.be/19dPI_hqL6U

See our video online here: http://youtu.be/19dPI_hqL6U

Traditional

Traditional education, also known as back-to-basics, conventional education or customary education, refers to long-established customs found in schools that society has traditionally deemed appropriate.

 OBE –  (Outcome Based Education)

Methods of outcome-based education (OBE) are student-centered learning methods that focus on empirically measuring student performance (the “outcome”).

 COMPETENT

 -You can perform the job. (We refer also to the outcome of the actual skill.)

-Someone assessed you physically to ensure you can do the job.

-Evidence was collected to provide proof that you competent.

 NYC  (Not Yet Competent)

 -You can’t perform the job. (There might be one small part that you missed)

-You cannot perform the outcome or the skill on your own.

-Some of the evidence could not be collected as proof that you can perform the function.

-Get an opportunity to re-visit the learning any try again on another assessment.

 NQF  (National Qualifications Framework)

The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) is a Framework on which standards and qualifications, agreed to by education and training stakeholders throughout the country, are registered. It came into being through the South African Qualifications Authority Act (No. 58 of 1995, Government Gazette No. 1521, 4 October 1995), which provides for ‘the development and implementation of a National Qualifications Framework’.

NQF levels

 RPL

Recognition of Prior Learning is a process whereby people’s prior learning can be formally recognised in terms of registered qualifications and unit standards, regardless of where and how the learning was attained. RPL acknowledges that people never stop learning, whether it takes place formally at an educational institution, or whether it happens informally.

The process of RPL is as follows:

  • Identifying what a person knows and can do;
  • Matching the person’s knowledge, skills and experience to specific standards and the associated assessment criteria of a qualification;
  • Assessing the learning against those standards; and
  • Crediting the person for skills, knowledge and experience built up through formal, informal and non-formal learning that occurred in the past

KEY PRINCIPLES OF ASSESSMENT

Appropriateness The method of assessment must be suited to the performance being assessed.
Fairness The method of assessment must not present any barriers to achievements, which are not related to the evidence.
Manageability The methods used must make for easily arranged, cost-effective assessments that do not interfere with learning.
Time efficient Assessments must not interfere with normal daily activities or productivity.
Integration into work or learning: Evidence collection must be integrated into the work or learning process where it is appropriate and feasible.
Validity The assessment must focus on the requirements laid down in the standard; i.e. the assessment must be fit for purpose.
Direct The activities in the assessment must mirror the conditions of actual performance as closely as possible.
Authenticity The assessor must be satisfied that the work being assessed is attributable to the person being assessed.
Sufficient The following questions can guide the assessor.

  • Valid
  • Sufficient
  • Authentic
  • Currency
  • Relevancy
  • Consistency
Systematic Planning and recording must be sufficiently rigorous to ensure that assessment is fair.
Open Learners must contribute to the planning and accumulation of evidence. Assessment candidates must understand the assessment process and the criteria that apply.
Consistent The same assessor must make the same judgement in similar circumstances.The judgment made, must be parallel to the judgment which would be made by other assessors.

 ASSESSMENT TYPES

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT SUMMATIVE  ASSESSMENT
• Designed to support the teaching and learning process• Assists in the planning future learning• Diagnoses the learner’s strength and weaknesses• Provides feedback to the learner on his/her progress• Helps to make decisions on the readiness of learners to do a summative assessment

• Is developmental  in nature

• Credits/certificates are not awarded

 

• At the end of a learning programme(qualification, unit standard, or part qualification)• To determine whether the learner is competent  or not yet competent• In knowledge and inputs-based systems, this usually occurs after a specified period of study, e.g. one year• In OBET, learner-readiness determines when assessments will take place• Is carried out when the assessor and the learner agree that the learner is ready for

assessment

ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Assessment Process

Sponsored by TRAINYOUCAN

TRAINYOUCAN  is an accredited training provider through the South African Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) and provide both accredited and customised learning programmes to organisations looking to maximise their investment in developing their staff.