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What are Qualification Assessment Specifications - QAS

The AQP will set the national standards to ensure validity and consistency of the external   summative   assessment.  The   QAS  form   an   integral   part   of   every occupational qualification and are developed for each occupational qualification and outline and record the following information: Title of occupational qualification; Curriculum reference number; Name and details of the AQP; External assessment strategy; Key occupational outcomes; The point(s) at which the qualification must be assessed (allowing for production cycle if required); Critical  identified  elements  of  ‘internal  assessment’  to  be  externally moderated (if any); Eligibility requirements for candidates for exter[...]

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QCTO

Now you can also visit the public discussion on QCTO related topics here.

About the QCTO 

Quality Council for Trades & Occupations

The QCTO is one of the three Quality Councils provided for in the National Qualifications Framework Act (NQF Act No. 67 of 2008).

The QCTO was established under the Skills Development Act as amended in 2008 and became operational on the 1st April 2010 following the publication of Government Gazette No 33059, 1st April 2010

1. Vision

    QCTO vision is to qualify a skilled and capable workforce.

2. Mission

    The QCTO’s mission is to effectively and efficiently manage the occupational qualifications sub-framework in order to set standards, develop and quality assure national occupational qualifications for all who want a trade or occupation and, where appropriate, professions.

3. Values

Innovation and Excellence

    We rise to opportunities and challenges, we continuously learn, we are innovative and we consistently produce work of distinction and fine quality, on time, and in line with our clients’ needs.

Empowerment and Recognition

    • We enable people to make things happen, we encourage and support one another when and where needed, and we celebrate successful accomplishment of work.

 

Respect and Dignity

    We value and show consideration for all the people we work with, treat one another with kindness and thoughtfulness, and embrace inclusivity.

Ethics and Integrity

    We embrace and practice a moral code of trustworthiness, honesty and truthfulness in everything we say and do, and we honour our promises and commitments.

Ownership and Accountability

    We take ownership of our responsibilities and we answer for our decisions and actions.

Authenticity

    We protect the public by issuing authentic, quality qualifications.

Provided by www.trainyoucan.co.za
Now you can also visit the public discussion on QCTO related topics here.

Most meetings need people playing four roles

Most meetings need people playing four roles:

1-Leader convenes the meeting

2-Facilitator keeps discussion and decision-making process moving along

3-Recorder takes notes on paper, laptop or on flip charts

4-Timekeeper reminds leader when time almost up for a given item.

Make sure these roles are assigned prior to a meeting

Leader role

The leader convenes the meeting and takes responsibility for communication before and after. The leader may lead discussion on all items or may ask others, including a facilitator, to lead all or parts of the meeting. This enables the leader to be a full participant in discussions.

Facilitator role

The facilitator keeps the discussion and decision-making process moving along. The facilitator takes responsibility for the process, but should not be involved in the content of the meeting. A facilitator is especially useful if the leaders holds a very strong opinion on an agenda item. Having a facilitator enables the leader to be a full participant.

Recorder role

The recorder takes notes on paper, laptop or on flip charts. Meeting notes should be distributed as soon after the meeting as possible. The longer the lag, the less confidence the members have that their investment will result in action. For groups that meet regularly, the recorder is responsible for keeping previous meeting notes and agendas in one place where they can be referenced later, such as through a shared network drive or a notebook, etc.

Timekeeper

The timekeeper reminds leader when time almost up for a given item. A stop watch or small clock is invaluable

Helping People to Contribute Effectively During Meetings

There are many reasons for non-participation during meetings including lack of preparation, shyness, being overawed by rank or someone’s specialist knowledge, being put off by another’s aggressiveness or dominant behaviour or just pure laziness.

To draw out the silent type and protect them from intimidation it might be helpful to ask questions that tap their expertise, praise their good ideas, openly note their contributions, call on those that are shy or junior first.

Of course you may also have to limit the long winded. This can be done by setting the ground rules at the start including how long any one person can speak for at a time. You should also request that remarks be confined to the topic of discussion. If someone still insists on an opera length speech you may have to tactfully but firmly insist that you move on.

It is equally important to remain focused on the agenda and what needs to be achieved. To do this you will want to summarise progress and remind everyone of the meeting’s objectives. You will also have to interrupt if the discussion gets out of hand, off topic, too heated or rowdy. Act quickly if a serious disagreement arrises.

Sometimes a participant may have something worthy to contribute but may not be the best public speaker. At such times it is the chair’s job to rescue that person by helpfully summating what they think he/she was trying to say.

As the meeting chair you should work to encourage diverse points of view, especially if it is a problem solving or brainstorming session. Well run meetings enable a group of people to achieve more than the sum of their individual efforts, through the creation of synergy and the combination of their collective expertise.

As the chair you should encourage all opinions and perspectives to be explored but be prepared to hightlight bias and oversights. Some participants will need to broaden their viewpoints while others must be encouraged to be more realistic.

To generate ideas you may want to try brainstorming, asking open questions (ones that cannot be simply answered by yes or no), encourage partial ideas, reserve your own ideas until the end, clarify and paraphrase for others (make sure you ask them to confirm that you have it right), and the use of verbal and non-verbal reinforcement.

Non-verbal Messages Allow People To:

Non-verbal Messages Allow People To:

      -Reinforce or modify what is said in words. For example, people may nod their heads vigorously when saying “Yes” to emphasise that they agree with the other person, but a shrug of the shoulders and a sad expression when saying “I’m fine thanks,” may imply that things are not really fine at all!

 

      -Convey information about their emotional state.

 

      -Define or reinforce the relationship between people.

 

      -Provide feedback to the other person.

 

    -Regulate the flow of communication, for example by signalling to others that they have finished speaking or wish to say something.

Non-verbal Messages Allow People To

Interpersonal communication not only involves the explicit meaning of words, the information or message conveyed, but also refers to implicit messages, whether intentional or not, which are expressed through non-verbal behaviours.

Non-verbal communications include facial expressions, the tone and pitch of the voice, gestures displayed through body language (kinesics) and the physical distance between the communicators (proxemics). These non-verbal signals can give clues and additional information and meaning over and above spoken (verbal) communication.

Non-verbal Messages Allow People To:

      Reinforce or modify what is said in words. For example, people may nod their heads vigorously when saying “Yes” to emphasise that they agree with the other person, but a shrug of the shoulders and a sad expression when saying “I’m fine thanks,” may imply that things are not really fine at all!

 

      Convey information about their emotional state.

 

      Define or reinforce the relationship between people.

 

      Provide feedback to the other person.

 

    Regulate the flow of communication, for example by signalling to others that they have finished speaking or wish to say something.